Jane Austen's Pride and Prejudice is a witty, tried-and-true, romantic literature composition that encompasses the totality of romantic courtship, marriage, kinship and relations reminiscent of the Victorian Regency Era. The Bennetts are a thriving family with vivacious daughters Elizabeth, Jane, Mary, Catherine and Lydia. Mr. Darcy is a somewhat arrogant, haughty but comely gentleman who spends the majority of the novel trying to successfully court the stubborn and light-hearted Elizabeth. Elizabeth is inquisitive, indecisive and curious, often maintaining she should proceed with caution in regards to admiration declarations from Mr. Darcy. Incredibly modest, at times she doubts her own magnetism yet readers learn Mr. Darcy appreciates her despite her insecurities, uncertainties and despite their minor, but notable, social class differences and differences in economic priviledge. She does not want to easily succumb to Mr. Darcy's advances and enjoys the thrill of denying Mr. Darcy's pining emotions, seeing it as somewhat of a fun, entertaining game but also as a necessity given her incessant questioning and her pursuit of a well-endowed, stable future life of domesticity. Jane Austen's deep character development, quest for articulation, emphasis on proper etiquette of the generation, vivid passage descriptions and quick-moving plot christen her a leading writer of English Literature during the Victorian Era. Jane Austen's Pride and Prejudice is a resounding classic with brash, temperamental characters who are so enthralled with one another they spend day by day ruminating on societal gossip, future liaisons and how these newly-formed unions literally have notable economic, social and psychological effects on their own reputations as well as of the country town they appreciate and as readers learn, truly love. - Review Written by Danielle

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