Because Internet

Because Internet

Understanding the New Rules of Language

eBook - 2019
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"A linguistically informed look at how our digital world is transforming the English language. Language is humanity's most spectacular open-source project, and the internet is making our language change faster and in more interesting ways than ever before. Internet conversations are structured by the shape of our apps and platforms, from the grammar of status updates to the protocols of comments and @replies. Linguistically inventive online communities spread new slang and jargon with dizzying speed. What's more, social media is a vast laboratory of unedited, unfiltered words where we can watch language evolve in real time. Even the most absurd-looking slang has genuine patterns behind it. Internet linguist Gretchen McCulloch explores the deep forces that shape human language and influence the way we communicate with one another. She explains how your first social internet experience influences whether you prefer "LOL" or "lol," why ~sparkly tildes~ succeeded where centuries of proposals for irony punctuation had failed, what emoji have in common with physical gestures, and how the artfully disarrayed language of animal memes like lolcats and doggo made them more likely to spread. Because Internet is essential reading for anyone who's ever puzzled over how to punctuate a text message or wondered where memes come from. It's the perfect book for understanding how the internet is changing the English language, why that's a good thing, and what our online interactions reveal about who we are"-- Provided by publisher.
"A linguistically informed look at how our digital world is transforming the English language. Language is humanity's most spectacular open-source project, and the internet is making our language change faster and in more interesting ways than ever before. The programmers behind our apps and platforms decide how our conversations are structured, from the grammar of status updates to the protocols of comments and @replies. Linguistically inventive online communities spread new slang and jargon with dizzying speed. What's more, social media is a vast laboratory of unedited, unfiltered words where we can language evolve in real time. Even the most absurd-looking slang has genuine patterns behind it. Internet linguist Gretchen McCulloch explores the deep forces that shape human language and influence the way we communicate with one another. She explains how the year you first accessed the internet determines how you talk online; how ~sparkly tildes~ became widely recognized as sarcasm punctuation; whether emoji are replacing words; and why internet dialects like doge, lolspeak, and snek are linguistically significant. Because Internet is essential reading for anyone who's ever puzzled over how to punctuate a text message or wondered where memes come from. It's the perfect book for understanding how the internet is changing the English language, why that's a good thing, and what our online interactions reveal about who we are"-- Provided by publisher.
Publisher: New York : Riverhead Books, 2019.
Copyright Date: ©2019
ISBN: 9780735210950
0735210950
Characteristics: 1 online resource

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AaronAardvark1940
Mar 13, 2020

This book was frustratingly difficult to read. It was borrowed because favorable reviews suggested it might help me understand how and why language has changed through the ascendance of the internet and social media. Although I appreciate the depth of meaning and color that English can bring to poetry and novels through its marvelous flexibility, when reading nonfiction, I prefer that denotative language be used to establish clarity and facilitate accessibility. When the author uses phrases like “a couple key features” (page 98) and “a couple main strategies” (page 123), I find myself longing for an “of” following the “couple,” distracting me from going straight to the comprehension of her arguments. Even as I type this, TCCL’s version of spellcheck tells me that there is something wrong with “get ahold” (page 112). She argues convincingly that “communicative practices which baffle us do have genuine, important meaning for the people who use them,” and I can agree with that. “A New Metaphor” is the final and clearest chapter in the book and made my struggle with the rest of it worth the effort.

The book is written entirely in the language of the internet. It is a history of internet language and a person’s ability to follow large parts of it depend on one’s knowledge of how online communication evolved. Speaking of which, her penultimate chapter on memes helped me understand a bit more about them. As the author mentions, Dawkins invented the word, and reading him was my introduction to the term. For some reason, that rather different context made it difficult for me to understand the new meaning ascribed to it. Still, a meme or two a day is enough for me, and the constant presence of these things in social media is tiresome.

But the point is, this is a history book, and as we all know, history is written by the winners.

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mclarjh
Oct 01, 2019

Very well researched; and very well written.

TEXTS AND TWEETS SHOULD BE WRITTEN LIKE TELEGRAMS ALL CAPS WITH PUNCTUATION SPELLED OUT STOP

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