Look Alive Out There

Look Alive Out There

Essays

eBook - 2018
Average Rating:
Rate this:
4
The characteristic heart and punch-packing observations are back, but with a newfound coat of maturity. A thin coat. More of a blazer, really. Fans of I Was Told There'd Be Cake and How Did You Get This Number know Sloane Crosley's life as a series of relatable but madcap misadventures. In Look Alive Out There, whether it's scaling active volcanoes, crashing shivas, playing herself on Gossip Girl, befriending swingers, or squinting down the barrel of the fertility gun, Crosley continues to rise to the occasion with unmatchable nerve and electric one-liners. And as her subjects become more serious, her essays deliver not just laughs but lasting emotional heft and insight. Crosley has taken up the gauntlets thrown by her predecessors--Dorothy Parker, Nora Ephron, David Sedaris--and crafted something rare, affecting, and true. Look Alive Out There arrives on the tenth anniversary of I Was Told There'd be Cake, and Crosley's essays have managed to grow simultaneously more sophisticated and even funnier. And yet she's still very much herself, and it's great to have her back--and not a moment too soon (or late, for that matter).
Publisher: New York : MCD/Farrar, Straus and Giroux, 2018.
Edition: First edition.
ISBN: 9780374711801
0374711801
Characteristics: 1 online resource (240 pages)

Opinion

From Library Staff

Sloane Crosley has the fantastic ability to make the absurd relatable and to make the mundane feel major. Her latest book of autobiographical essays is filled with witty and self-deprecating observations regarding apartment life in a big city, motherhood and fertility, love advice from a retired ... Read More »

Sloane Crosley has the fantastic ability to make the absurd relatable and to make the mundane feel major. Her latest book of autobiographical essays is filled with witty and self-deprecating observations regarding apartment life in a big city, motherhood and fertility, love advice from a retired ... Read More »


From the critics


Community Activity

Comment

Add a Comment
m
mikaylatianli
Jun 18, 2019

This is one of my favorite essay collections, and after reading this I went and read every other Sloan Crosley book I could find (except for The Clasp). Funny, witty, and heavy enough that I remembered the stories long after they were over.

i
Indoorcamping
Jan 05, 2019

Sometimes you get to read the perfect book for the exact moment. This is such a book to help me survive my always-dreaded Christmas holiday season. You know how some people just have a way with words that makes you remember the witty turn, the sarcastic description, the funny phrase that lifts up the conversation? This whole book is like that. It's like that friend you had in high school who leaned over to your desk and said something that was so funny and smart that you had to do everything you could to suppress your laughter until class was over.

It doesn't matter where she is or what she's doing, whether it's annoying backyard neighbors, egg harvesting (the female type), or climbing up Mount Cotapaxi, she's such a compelling voice that I forgot whatever it was I didn't like about my own life at the moment and went along for the ride in her head. Every story is an adventure, inward and outward, and I feel like I learned so much, not just factually about, say, harvesting your eggs or solutions to annoying backyard teenagers, but a new way to respond to life situations. I would rather learn by her mistakes than by mine. And hers, especially the mundane-sounding ones - my favorite - are so delightful.

w
WoodneathAngie
Sep 04, 2018

I really enjoy the particular intimacy of essays, and Crosley's latest collection was no exception. The first essay, "Wheels Up" showcases Crosley's humor, while later essays are more personal, exploring her fertility and identity fraud. I particularly enjoyed Crosley's encounters with a neighbor and domain-stealing "entrepreneur."

DBRL_KrisA May 31, 2018

The jacket notes compare Crosley to David Sedaris or Nora Ephron or Dorothy Parker, masters of the humorous essay. While there are moments of sarcastic wit, particularly in essays like Outside Voices, they are only occasional breaks from overly serious, sometimes confusing tales from the author's life. (The Doctor Is a Woman, relating Crosley's forays into the world of fertility clinics and egg freezing, had me thoroughly confused.)

Age

Add Age Suitability

There are no ages for this title yet.

Summary

Add a Summary

There are no summaries for this title yet.

Notices

Add Notices

There are no notices for this title yet.

Quotes

Add a Quote

There are no quotes for this title yet.

Explore Further

Recommendations

Subject Headings

  Loading...

Find it at CPL

  Loading...
[]
[]
To Top