The Noodle Maker of Kalimpong

The Noodle Maker of Kalimpong

The Dalai Lama's Brother and His Struggle for Tibet

Book - 2015
Average Rating:
1
1
Rate this:
Shortly before midnight on March 17, 1959 , the Dalai Lama, without his glasses and dressed as an ordinary Tibetan solider, slipped out of his summer residence with only four aides at his side. At that moment, he became the symbolic head of the Tibetan government in exile, and Gyalo Thondup, the only one of the Dalai Lama's brothers not to don the robes of a Buddhist monk, became the fulcrum for the independence movement.

The Noodle Maker of Kalimpong tells the extraordinary story of the Dalai Lama's family, the exile of the spiritual leader of Tibetan Buddhism from Tibet, and the enduring political crisis that has seen remote and bleakly beautiful Tibet all but disappear as an independent nation-state.

For the last sixty years, Gyalo Thondup has been at the at the heart of the epic struggle to protect and advance Tibet in the face of unreliable allies, overwhelming odds, and devious rivals, playing an utterly determined and unique role in a Cold War high-altitude superpower rivalry. Here, for the first time, he reveals how he found himself whisked between Chiang Kai-shek, Zhou Enlai, Jawaharlal Nehru, and the CIA, as he tried to secure, on behalf of his brother, the future of Tibet.
Publisher: New York : PublicAffairs, [2015]
Edition: First edition.
ISBN: 9781610392891
1610392892
9781610392907
Characteristics: pages cm
Additional Contributors: Thurston, Anne F.

Opinion

From the critics


Community Activity

Comment

Add a Comment

l
lauk
Aug 07, 2015

Recommended for readers interested in the history of the Tibet issue. In addition to the facts, Thondup also elaborates on the frustration he had in his role as a deal broker. Interestingly enough, the problems did not always come from the communist side. However, the genocide that the communist committed is undeniable.

Quotes

Add a Quote

l
lauk
Aug 07, 2015

We get ourselves in unnecessary trouble by doing things our way without regard for the other side. Eventually, the suspicion with which the Chinese view the world may destroy them. But we Tibetan may destroy ourselves, too. [...] We even have a proverb about this: Tibetans are ruined by hope, Chinese are ruined by suspicion.

Age

Add Age Suitability

There are no ages for this title yet.

Summary

Add a Summary

There are no summaries for this title yet.

Notices

Add Notices

There are no notices for this title yet.

Explore Further

Browse by Call Number

Subject Headings

  Loading...

Find it at CPL

  Loading...
[]
[]
To Top