God Help the Child

God Help the Child

eBook - 2015
Average Rating:
19
4
2
Rate this:
Spare and unsparing, -- From the Hardcover edition.
Publisher: New York : Alfred A. Knopf, 2015.
Edition: First edition.
ISBN: 9780385353175
0385353170
9780307749109
0307740927
9780307740922
0307594173
9780307594174
Characteristics: 1 online resource (pages)

Opinion

From the critics


Community Activity

Comment

Add a Comment

Franln Jun 19, 2017

I like Toni Morrison's writing style. This is a very strange story but intriguing nonetheless.

a
abcDena
Oct 02, 2016

I'm also listening to this book...still listening. It took some weird turns in the last quarter and I'm not sure what to make of it. I really enjoyed the book, and was so intrigued by Bride's character that I didn't want the book to end.

CMLibrary_sfetzer May 17, 2016

Set in present day California, God Help the Child follows the story of Bride—a girl whose mother never loved her due to the dark tone of her skin. Facing constant rejection from her mother as a child, Bride made a choice which offered some temporary relief. Bride’s choice continues to shape her well into adulthood and leads her on a path that intersects with the lives of some truly interesting people. Not a single word is wasted in this brief novel which is told in varying points of view. Morrison approaches serious issues such as racial identity, child abuse, and acceptance with an unparalleled grace. Fans of Morrison’s previous work will enjoy this more modern but no less powerful new novel.

MirandaRiley8796 May 04, 2016

What a waste of time, could hardly finish it, it went nowhere! Disappointed doesn't begin to cover it!!

s
sharon711
Jan 28, 2016

A powerful story about how we are loved and raised as children affects us as adults.

r
Reclak
Nov 25, 2015

I agree with the Guardian's review of this book. Morrison set the tone early but left so many things dangling. These devices promise to lend insight to the character's conflict but fail to do so as they are employed in the novel. In my opinion. I am a huge fan of the way Morrison as an American writer uses the fantastic, mystical and implausible. She weaves in these elements firmly rooting and orienting the drive of her storytelling. She did this so well in her previous novels from "Sula" and "Song of Solomon" to "Beloved". I guess I was expecting the same here.

I am such a fan that I can let Toni M. be Toni in new and different ways. Perhaps "God Help the Child" represents a stage of her metamorphosis. She has never seemed to be afraid of tackling disturbing themes of a sexual nature and is at her finest when writing the internal conflicts of strong women. Her pen reveals, leaves, somuch for contemplation as you read the work. However, as a reader I recognize that a large part of the experience, the interaction while engaged, is what the reader brings to the material as it filters through one's consciousness. The book undergoes its final edit in the mind of the reader. This is fine if there is enough plausible material presented.

Disharmony, loose ends, uneven writing. A more interesting tale to be told is in answer to the question, "Why DID you write this book?"

v
voisjoe1_0
Sep 26, 2015

Toni Morrison portrayed African-Americans in the 19th century with Beloved, the 20th century with The Bluest Eye, and now the 21st century with God Help the Child. In this novel, Morrison deals with skin darkness of African-Americans (a subject mainly unknown outside the African-American community), careers for African-American women and predation of children. It is a very good, but not great novel dealing with these subjects. The structure is somewhat unusual in that the chapter titles indicate which character is narrating that portion of the novel (with a few sections being told by the author).

b
brangwinn
Sep 06, 2015

Read the lines about how you treat children carefully in the first few pages, for they are words that come back to haunt the characters time after time. The storyline from various perspectives helps to create the important message of this book. You do not have to let the actions (or sins) or others or even your actions in the past force you into a life you don’t want. You have the power to create a life you want, even though it may not be one that has wealth or fame. As usual, Morrison’s characters are varied, realistic and thought-provoking. This is one of my most favorite Toni Morrison novels.

r
readsalot80
Jul 24, 2015

Bride a dark skinned black woman who was raised by a light skinned mother. She was strict with her to help her survive in the world. Bride remembers the only time her mother touched her was when she testified in court and put a teacher in jail. The pedophilia in this book is hard to read but realistic as I learned as a nurse. I liked that the book was told through the characters of the book. The ending was a bit unbelievable to me but the rest of book I enjoyed the book and would recommend it to others to read.

A superficial story of adult success despite childhood neglect. There is no remorse anywhere and a final sad knell for any future children born to these sad people. I don't know why Morrison chose this theme but it did not work for me.

View All Comments

Quotes

Add a Quote

l
ladybugg
Jan 04, 2017

When fear rules, obedience is the only survival choice

r
Reclak
Jan 02, 2016

"It's hard for a young girl living in a haunted house."
"No moving. No leaving. It's all right the way it is."
"You know as well as I do that people who die bad don't stay in the ground."
"Beloved, she my daughter. She mine. See. She come back to me of her own free will and I don't have to explain a thing."
'Beloved' Toni Morrison

r
Reclak
Jan 02, 2016

"Eva's last child, Plum, to whom she hoped to bequeath everything, floated in a constant swaddle of love and affection, until 1917 when he went to war...it was Hannah who found the bent spoon black from steady cooking. So late one night in 1921, Eva...rolled a bit of newspaper into a tight stick, lit it and threw it onto the bed where the kerosene-soaked Plum lay in snug delight." 'Sula' Toni Morrison

l
lisatofts
May 05, 2015

“Whether he was lying under her body, hovering above it or holding her in his arms, her blackness thrilled him. Then he was certain that he not only held the night, he owned it, and if the night he held in his arms was not enough, he could always see starlight in her eyes.”

Age

Add Age Suitability

lilly29 Jun 12, 2015

lilly29 thinks this title is suitable for 19 years and over

l
lisatofts
May 05, 2015

lisatofts thinks this title is suitable for All Ages

Summary

Add a Summary

There are no summaries for this title yet.

Notices

Add Notices

There are no notices for this title yet.

Explore Further

Subject Headings

  Loading...

Find it at CPL

  Loading...
[]
[]
To Top