White Man's Club

White Man's Club

Schools, Race, and the Struggle of Indian Acculturation

Book - 2007
Rate this:
Tens of thousands of Indian children filed through the gates of government schools to be trained as United States citizens. Part of a late-nineteenth-century campaign to eradicate Native cultures and communities, these institutions became arenas where whites debated the terms of Indian citizenship, but also where Native peoples resisted the power of white schooling and claimed new skills to protect and redefine tribal and Indian identities. In White Man's Club , schools for Native children are examined within the broad framework of race relations in the United States for the first time. Jacqueline Fear-Segal analyzes multiple schools and their differing agendas and engages with the conflicting white discourses of race that underlay their pedagogies. She argues that federal schools established to Americanize Native children did not achieve their purpose; instead they progressively racialized American Indians. A far-reaching and bold account of the larger issues at stake, White Man's Club challenges previous studies for overemphasizing the reformers' overtly optimistic assessment of the Indians' capacity for assimilation and contends that a covertly racial agenda characterized this educational venture from the start. Asking the reader to consider the legacy of nineteenth-century acculturation policies, White Man's Club incorporates the life stories and voices of Native students and traces the schools' powerful impact into the twenty-first century. Fear-Segal draws upon a rich array of source material. Traditional archival research is interwoven with analysis of maps, drawings, photographs, the built environment, and supplemented by oral and family histories. Creative use of new theoretical and interpretive perspectives brings fresh insights to the subject matter.
Publisher: Lincoln : University of Nebraska Press, c2007.
ISBN: 9780803220249
0803220243
Characteristics: xxiii, 395 p. : ill., maps ; 24 cm.

Related Resources


Opinion


Featured Blogs and Events

The Real All-Americans: The First All-American Indian Football Team

The Carlisle Industrial School for Indians, the first of its kind, was founded by Richard Henry Pratt, who thought he should "civilize" these indigenous children of America by taking them away from their parents and placing them in military-style boarding schools. The before-and-after image of Tom Torlino shown here is an example of the dramatic changes the students endured. Some of the scho… (more)

The Real All Americans: the First all American Indian Football Team

The Carlisle Industrial School for Indians, the first of its kind, was founded by Richard Henry Pratt. He thought he should "civilize" these indigenous children of America by taking them away from their parents and placing them in military style boarding schools. The before and after image of Tom Torlino is an example of the dramatic changes that the students endured. Some students wanted to … (more)


From the critics


Community Activity

Comment

Add a Comment

There are no comments for this title yet.

Age

Add Age Suitability

There are no ages for this title yet.

Summary

Add a Summary

There are no summaries for this title yet.

Notices

Add Notices

There are no notices for this title yet.

Quotes

Add a Quote

There are no quotes for this title yet.

Explore Further

Browse by Call Number

Subject Headings

  Loading...

Find it at CPL

  Loading...
[]
[]
To Top